Micklewhite Wharf – We’re Getting There

Hullo all, I realise it’s been a while since I updated this thing. You know how it is with this hobby. Anyway, the layout’s been taking shape over the past few weeks, and now looks like this:

IMG_1659

There’s still a long way to go, obviously. I’ve decided to scrap the “siding in the sky” idea (although a siding on a stub of viaduct isn’t impossible – only today I saw one on the approach to Cannon Street). Instead, the bridge will act as a scenic break. It’ll still carry a railway, but will be static.

A lot of the scenic features you see above are from Saxondale Mouldings, in their Finishing Touches range. They don’t have a website, but sell quite a lot on eBay. I encountered them at the Croydon show last week. They produce accessories in various scales, mostly lorry and wagon loads. The crates saved me quite a bit of work making and painting clutter for the wharf. The yellow resin thing at the back is, I think, intended as a viaduct side. I think it looks a bit like an early 19th century dockside building, so that’s what it is. I think a whole row of corrugated iron warehouses would be a little monotonous.

Mud, mud, glorious mud, nothing quite like it for ruining shipping.

Mud, mud, glorious mud, nothing quite like it for ruining shipping.

I’m rather pleased with the canal basin. I wasn’t sure what to do with this at first. I wanted it to be muddied up in order to add to the general air of dereliction I was trying to achieve. If a dock isn’t in use, it won’t be dredged and it’ll silt up pretty quickly. Here are some examples from my own explorations.

St Katherine's Dock

St Katherine's Dock

One advantage of the docks in London closing down is that there’s no shortage of silt. But I was worried that, again, it might look boring to just have mud. I considered a boat, but most boat kits are pretty expensive, especially given that this one would most likely be chopped up to fit the space. In any case, most boat kits are unsuitable for the London Docklands. The other option was the Hornby butty boat, but I didn’t much fancy the idea of hacking resin about – the dust is clingy as the Dickens. Fortunately, The Finishing Touches came to the rescue again with a short boat that looks about right for a canal – the sort of thing that might be used to carry miscellaneous rubbish and just moored wherever. There was a similar vessel moored in Richmond a few years ago until it sank.

St Saviour's Dock

St Saviour's Dock

However, in the meantime, I’d had another idea for making the basin interesting. I’d come across a photo of an abandoned canal basin in the East End that had filled with rubbish brought in by the incoming tide. So I used Polyfilla to create the mud and pressed various bits of plastic, wood and card into it. The edges were lined with sections of those wooden stirrers you get in Starbucks and suchlike places. Finally, everything was painted with Tamiya Olive Drab for that slimy effect.

What else, what else… The crane is Wills, again intended to be long-abandoned. The lamp hut is also Wills, which I’ve weathered down to an acceptably grimy shade. The girders and the lighter-coloured crates are Exclusive First Editions, albeit I’ve given the crates a wash in brownish-grey thinned acrylic to tone them down in line with the rest of the scenery.
More when… well, when I get around to it, really.
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